Things That We Recommend The Owners Of The Taft Theatre Do The Next Time Ryan Adams Plays Cincinnati

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Dear Owners of the Taft Theatre,

You have a great venue! We thoroughly enjoyed ourselves at Saturday night’s Ryan Adams show. Well, mostly. The thing about the Taft is that it has seats, so the shows you put on (often acoustic, as this one was) require people to, you know, sit in them. This has its advantages. Being old and crotchety (especially after nine o’clock), we like that we don’t have to stand for two hours. Seats help maintain that chill vibe us thirtysomethings strive for these days.

The disadvantage of seats is that you cannot get away from the annoying people sitting next to you. And there were a lot of annoying people at Saturday night’s show. (We’ll leave aside the question of what this may or may not say about Ryan Adams’ fans.) Perhaps all of them were simply seated directly behind, next to and everywhere around us. Regardless, we want to recommend a couple changes in your admittance policy for future shows that we might attend.

These are in no particular order.

1. Do not admit anyone with an iPhone who will obviously only be using it to check her Facebook status during the show. These people should be obvious to spot.

2. Do not admit anyone who will clap along to the songs. They are morons.

3. If someone looks like a hummer, ask how loud and off-key. Don’t let them in regardless of how they answer.

4. Perhaps screen people by asking if they plan to shout idiotic things like, “Delicious!,” “I’m just misunderstood” and “Come pick me up” eight dozen times. If they say “yes,” you know what to do.

5. Don’t just reprimand people who use their phones/cameras to take pictures. Take a cue from the polar bears of Svalbard and smash them.

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Of course, we realize that you’re in the business of turning a profit, and it may be in your best interests to allow the people who comprise groups #1 through #5 to attend and instead turn away us, the outnumbered, meekly obedient, quietly appreciative concertgoers that we are. If this be your decision, we will rue it, but we will understand.

We will then honor it by crushing your rib cage like a scorned Svalbardian polar bear.

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Sincerely,

The Vores

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5 Comments

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5 responses to “Things That We Recommend The Owners Of The Taft Theatre Do The Next Time Ryan Adams Plays Cincinnati

  1. Matt

    I am now adopting the practice of yelling “DELICIOUS!” at totally inappropriate times. Thank you Ryan Adams.

  2. Agreed! The guy sitting behind me thought he was the songbird of his generation. It took all of my composure not to turn around and ask if I should be paying him to perform for the evening! He was singing quietly enough not to drown out DRA but just loud enough to be obnoxious. I did, however, make a few noticeable gestures and sighs to signal my annoyance. This usually shut him up for a song or two before picking right back up. UGH. When a peformer has to stop a song (as DRA did at the beginning of Wonderwall) because the crowd is getting on his nerves, said crowd should take a hint and shut up.

  3. voreblog

    Thank you, Matt (and Anne Evans) for affirming that we are not elitist music snobs who turn up our noses at the bourgeoisie. There are many things we love about Ohio, but its music crowds is certainly not one of them. This leads us to a final suggestion for what the Taft Theatre could do: relocate to not-Ohio.

    Delicious.

  4. Dan G.

    i am down with this
    also, i submit to you the complete opposite of this review. when you read it, try not to forget that an actual journalist was writing this. fight back the rage from your eyes until you make it all the way through.

    http://blogs.seattleweekly.com/reverb/2011/10/ryan_adams_could_do_no_wrong_a.php

    • voreblog

      We stumbled across this review whilst researching our own. Erin suffered a rage stroke while reading it. I read it three times to make sure it wasn’t satire. Lester Bangs is rolling in his grave.

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